More About Graduation

ESU Image

The OR-17 cohort will be graduating Sunday, August 12, 2018 at 1 PM at the OHSU Auditorium at Oregon Health & Science University on the SW Sam Jackson Park Road. Here is a map: http://www.ohsu.edu/map/ . Parking available in Lots 10 & D.

Speakers will be Natalia Fernandez, curator and archivist of the Oregon Multicultural Archives and OSU Queer Archives at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon, and  Lynne Stahl, OR-17 Emporia SLIM cohort.

A Beginner’s Guide to Library School

This past weekend the OR-12 cohort had orientation. As OR-10 moves from library school and fully into the world of information professionals, it’s time to let the new kids take over, but not without some parting gifts. Those gifts: lots of links and information to help you out as your journey begins!

Congratulations! You’re in library school. And if you’re with Emporia’s School of Library and Information Management (SLIM), you are very lucky indeed.  It can be very overwhelming after orientation. There’s a lot of information (appropriate as Information Overload Day is in August) and two years can seem like a long time. First things first: it’s okay to be overwhelmed. There’s a lot coming at you all at once. Recognize it for what it is and then start to parse things out. Once you get into a rhythm, it becomes much easier.

Now some tips and tricks.

DO:

  • Get a Twitter account. Right now. And follow us @SCALAoregon. There’s a ton of information out there and Twitter is an amazing way to get a lot of information in small and easy to digest pieces. Are you stuck looking for a topic for a paper on reference? Tweet to your followers and get some feedback. Find out about events and goings-ons in your neck of the woods or follow live tweets from conferences and events you couldn’t get to.
  • Start a blog (like Turner). Or at least start following a lot of blogs. Share your ideas with the world, get involved in the comments, and connect with your community. I follow the Public Library Association (PLA), the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), and the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) blogs because I am interested in public youth librarianship. Where are your interests? Find the association relevant to that and start following their blog. Other great blogs to follow include:
  • Be like Jim Carrey in the middle of this movie. Say yes to every opportunity even it seems like you maybe don’t know how to do it (thanks to Rachel Bridgewater for this advice). Go to that conference. Speak up in class. Present that paper. You can do so much more than you know and even if it doesn’t turn out perfectly, there are learning opportunities at every turn. This is how you start to network.
  • Listen to your adviser (especially if it’s Perri). She knows the system, knows how to help you, and can get you to the end. In fact, she is what will get you to the end and you’ll feel a sense of pride on graduation day when she calls your name.
  • Get a library job or a volunteer position. Like yesterday. Volunteering is a fantastic way to find out what you want to do with your degree or maybe what you don’t want to do. Libraries love volunteers and they love library students. Multnomah County’s Volunteer Services has a number of options for those who want to work in libraries. Go ahead and ask around.
  • Sign up for list-servs. Your school one, a job list, one for your state. If you’re in Oregon, Libs-Or is invaluable. You may want to filter them into a different folder so it doesn’t overwhelm your in-box, but this is a great way to get information about conferences, articles, what’s going on with your school and state.
  • Back up your work. Save it on your computer, then again on a jump drive or external drive (or both). Load it up into Google Docs (which changes the formatting, but the content is still there) or Dropbox (which doesn’t change formatting). As an aside, these last two are great ways to collaborate with your classmates on projects.
  • Read Turner’s advice for new students.
  • Join your student organization. Want to do more than attend events? Lead them! Gain leadership skills! Make friends! Learn how to fund raise and do it some more! (PS: Elections for the new SCALA Oregon board are on Saturday. More information will be posted soon).
  • Join a national organization. As a student you get a great deal with combo ALA/OLA memberships.

Don’t

  • Bemoan group work. You’re going to have a group project nearly every semester and likely one per class. Librarianship is about collaboration and what you do in library school is great practice. It teaches you how to work together, how to lead, and how to present. You will get very comfortable with your classmates and they are the easiest audience you will every present in front of. Cherish this time.
  • Freak out if you can’t do any or all of this in the first semester. Give yourself time to figure out how to organize your life. You’ll get there.
  • Forget your friends and how to have fun, but “I have a project due” is a great way to get out of anything. They’ll understand.

Good luck to OR-11 as they move into their final year and to OR-12 as they plunk away at the first months of library school life. You’re now a member of an amazing community. Welcome!

Rebecca Chernay is a member of the recently graduate ESU’s OR-10 cohort and specializes in children’s and youth librarianship. She is the current Web Presence & Social Networking Coordinator for SCALA, but is excited to hand the post off this Saturday.

More About Graduation

The OR-10 cohort will be graduating Sunday, August 14, 2011 at 1 PM at the Old Library Auditorium at Oregon Health & Science University.

The speakers will be Special Library Association president Cindy Romaine as the commencement speaker as well as State Librarian Jim Scheppke and OR-1o students Nyssa Walsh and LeGrand Olsen.

SCALA Scholarship Opportunity

The Emporia State University Student Government recently awarded SCALA $1,268 to assist select students with travel costs to national and regional conferences. In an email to the SLIM listserv, Dr. Cecilia Salvatore outlined the scholarship application process:

“Students should apply to receive these scholarships as soon as

possible. Students who will be presenting or who have formally signed

up to volunteer at these conferences will be given preference. A

committee will review the applications.

“To Apply:

Email Dr. Cecilia Salvatore (csalvato@emporia.edu) or Matt Upson

(mupson@emporia.edu) – Please label the email subject heading: “SCALA

Scholarships – Your Name”

“Provide:

1. Your contact information

2. A 2-page statement describing why you should receive financial

assistance to attend a specific conference and how attending that

conference can contribute to your professional growth

3. An abstract of your presentation (if you plan on presenting).

Remember, preference will be given to those who will be presenting.

“Deadline: If you are planning on attending the ALA annual conference

in July, please turn in your applications by June 1. All other

applicants please apply by August 15.”

Updating the Blog Calendar

By Laureen Burger (OR9), Web Manager

I am currently in the process of adding events and SLIM-Oregon classes to our blog calender. If you have a library or information science event you would like posted to the blog calendar, please e-mail me at vintageredhead22[at]gmail[dot]com. I haven’t yet added all the Fall, 2008, SLIM classes, so if you would like to see a Fall SLIM-OR schedule, there is one available here.

Ten Practical Tips for New Library Students

(Many thanks to Monique Lloyd for contributing the following article. The SLIM-OR SCALA Blog welcomes submissions relevant to library and information science. If you would like to submit an article, please attach it to an e-mail and send it to: VintageRedhead22[at]gmail[dot]com. We look forward to your contributions! –Laureen Burger, Web Manager)

by Monique Lloyd (OR-7)

If you really want something, and really work hard, and take advantage of opportunities and never give up, you will find a way. ~ Jane Goodall

Here is a list of ten tips I’d like to have had when I began library school.I hope you find some of them useful.Please feel free to add others by using the comment function.

1. Be generous and gracious.

I never lost anything by giving things away. ~ Anonymous

  • If you come across an article on a topic one of your classmates is interested in, email the citation.Do the same with information about scholarships, opportunities for publication or positions in professional organizations, informative blogs, wikis, or book reviews.
  • If you discover a classmate has landed a great job, been given a promotion, awarded a scholarship, or had a paper published, send a congratulatory email.
  • Send handwritten thank you notes from the heart to those who have, in big or small ways, inspired you, encouraged you, and advised you.

2. Network.

The way of the world is meeting people through other people. ~Robert Kerrigan

  • Get business cards printed now with your basic contact information. Keep a half-dozen behind your nametag when you go to a conference and you won’t have to fumble around to find them.
  • Go to as many conferences as you have time and money to attend. Wear something distinctive like a pin, scarf, or tie every day you are there; it will help people remember you.
  • Volunteer.Join roundtables and sections and be an active member.
  • Be bold. Stand up and ask a question or make a comment at a session.
  • Be brave. Go up to someone you admire, offer a brief introduction, compliment or comment on their speech, article, or book, and ask to exchange business cards.

3. Do what works for you.

Know thyself. ~ Socrates

  • Some thrive on stress and others need order and calm.Some like to carefully chunk out small pieces of time to do their assignments while others like to do the research early and then give themselves plenty of time to think before sitting down to write.Some like to work on multiple projects at the same time while others like to concentrate on each individually.Figure out what works for you and then do it.
  • Examine your writing, presentation, and technological skills critically. Highlight your strong areas while working on your weak ones.

4. Life intervenes.

The essence of wise living is anticipating the unanticipated and expecting the unexpected.~Kevin A. Woolsey

  • No matter how well we plan, life happens; someone we love dies, we lose our jobs, we become ill or injured. Sometimes life throws something at us and all we can do is catch it, deal with it, and move on.
  • Be kind to yourself.
  • Be flexible and adaptable, remain aware of what might go wrong, and try to have backup plans in place.

5. Don’t tell. Show.

What you will do matters.All you need is to do it.~ Judy Grahn

  • Actions count.Go above and beyond what is required or expected.
  • Translate what you know how to do to actual projects.

6. Be professional.

Always dress for your next job.~ Karen Diller

  • The library world is a small one and your reputation is important.Future employers will very likely Google your name to see what they can find out about you. Be careful what you reveal on social networking sites.
  • Be aware of and conform to professional ethical standards. Do your work skillfully and well. Always represent your employer, your fellow workers, and yourself with dignity and respect.

7. Find a mentor.

Mentor: Someone whose hindsight can become your foresight. ~ Anonymous

  • Take advantage of one of the mentoring programs offered by various professional organizations.
  • A mentor can advise and guide you by doing such things as reviewing resumes and cover letters, and providing advice on interviewing, salary expectations, and how to balance work and home.
  • When you are in a position to do so, give back by becoming a mentor to someone else.

8. Take care of yourself.

When your mother asks “Do you want a piece of advice?” it is a mere formality. It doesn’t matter if you answer yes or no. You’re going to get it anyway.~ Erma Bombeck

  • Remember all those things your mother told you about eating healthy foods on a regular schedule, exercising, washing your hands often, and getting enough rest?  Well, she was right.  And don’t forget

    to get a flu shot.

  • Don’t neglect your emotional and spiritual health.

9. Set aside time to think and reflect.

Never be afraid to sit awhile and think. ~ Lorraine Hansberry (A Raisin in the Sun)

  • Thinking and reflecting provides an opportunity to integrate new ideas, commonalties, differences, and interrelations.It can include analyzing assumptions, becoming aware of contextual assumptions by realizing our assumptions are created socially and personally in a specific cultural context, imagining alternative ways of thinking, and questioning universal truth claims using reflective skepticism.
  • Consider keeping a weekly personal journal to capture and further examine your reflections.

10. Be aware of available resources and use them.

There are plenty of opportunities out there.You can’t sit back and wait.~ Ellen Metcalf

  • Begin examining resumes of those who have positions similar to one you hope to obtain and note what skills and experiences they have.Look also at job descriptions for positions you hope to apply for when you have earned your degree and note what skills, experience, and attributesemployers are seeking.Make a list and start working towards them.
  • Pay close attention to the techniques used by presenters you enjoy and strive to emulate them. The most compelling presenters have clearly defined goals, demonstrate mastery of content, proceed seamlessly from point to point, recognize various learning styles, and are original and creative. The very best presenters use humor, tell stories to illustrate points, and are passionate about their topic.

Free Library Science e-books!

In support of National Library Week, April 13-19, e-content provider ebrary announced that it will provide librarians as well as students and faculty in library science and related programs with complimentary access to its Library Center for one year. The Library Center includes more than 85 full-text e-books covering topics such as digital library development, general collection development, and the history of libraries and librarianship, as well as illustrated guides from the Library of Congress….

Here’s the link to more information:

http://www.businesswire.com/news/google/20080409005439/en

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