PNCA Library Tour

Please join SCALA on a tour of the Pacific Northwest College of Art’s Library.

When: Sunday, April 11, 2010 at 12 PM

Where: PNCA

1241 NW Johnson St. Portland, OR

Just two blocks from the street car in the Pearl District.

This will be a great opportunity to check out a small, special academic library.

Invite your friends!

Speaker this Saturday!

Have class this Saturday? You should stop by and hear OR6 graduate Allie speak! Currently she’s a faculty librarian (Web & Outreach specialist) at Portland Community College in Portland, Oregon. Also, she’s a past SLIM-OR SCALA president, ALA emerging leader and next-gen librarian extraordinaire. She’s a terrifically engaging speaker and so we really encourage you not to miss this event!

When? Saturday, April 4, 2009 from 12:15pm – 1:15pm.

Where? PSU Cramer 371

For more information, you can visit her PCC page http://www.pcc.edu/library/contact/profiles/allie_flanary.html and personal site http://shinylib.com/

Thanks to Emily Ford

Emily Ford, OHSU Oregon Health Go Local Project Manager (an MLS librarian), visited SLIM-OR students this past weekend. Oregon Health Go Local (http://www.ohsu.edu/library/golocal/) will be an on-line directory of health related services for the entire state of Oregon. It will be searchable by health condition and integrated with the Medline Plus database. This unique project requires Emily Ford to take on many roles. She has successfully synthesized her outreach, management and technical skills to land as the project manager. It was interesting and informative to hear about Emily’s path to this position and how she hopes to grow this project into a vital community resource. For more information on the project and how to get involved please review the brochure and volunteer job description.

Also a SLIM-OR alumni, Todd Hannon, is the principle investigator of this project. It will be exciting to see this project go live!

Next SCALA Brown Bag Lunch Speaker: Oregon Health Go Local

For our next brown bag lunch speaker we are pleased to welcome Emily Ford, the Oregon Health Go Local Project Manager. This project is being coordinated by the Oregon Health & Science University Library. Emily Ford is an MLS librarian and you may have seen her in the Oregon Health Go Local project booth at the recent

OLA/WLA conference.

“Oregon Health Go Local will be an online directory of health services and providers throughout the state. As

part of MedlinePlus Go Local, the Oregon Health Go Local database will be integrated with the National

Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus database. From MedlinePlus health topics pages users will be able to

find health services and providers in Oregon based on specific health topics.”

Come learn more about this grant funded project. Emily Ford will speak about what the project is, why

it is being done and how you can become involved as a volunteer. Don’t miss this opportunity to engage with a local librarian and learn about a truly unique and exciting project.

When: Saturday June, 21st 12:15pm

Where: Cramer Hall Room 250 on the PSU campus

See you there!

Tour of OSU Library – February 5

SLIM-OR SCALA has arranged a tour of the OSU library in Corvallis. We will be shown the library, archives and special collections, and will be given the opportunity to ask questions. The tour will begin at 1:00 PM on Tuesday, Feb. 5 and should last 2 or 3 hours. (Sorry for the inconvenient scheduling, but the archives are only open weekdays during the day.) Please let us know if you are coming (and let people know if you are driving or need a ride) in the comments.

**************NEW! OSU Library Tour Schedule!*************

1:00-1:15 Meet at Reference Desk: Intro/Overview. Led by Anne-Marie Deitering.

1:20-1:50 Archives. Led by Tiah Edmunson-Morton.

1:55-2:40 Special Collections. Led by Cliff Mead/ Chris Peterson.

2:45-3:00 Wrap-up with Kate Yonezawa.

Learn more about OSU staff members here Staff directory

Rachel Bridgewater to speak at PSU on January 26th!

SLIM-OR SCALA is pleased to announce that well-known local librarian and SLIM alum Rachel Bridgewater will be the next featured speaker in our lunchtime speaker series! Starting in January 2008, Rachel will be the electronic resources librarian at Reed College. Prior to joining the staff at Reed, she was the Reference Coordinator at Washington State University, Vancouver.Ms. Bridgewater frequently speaks about technology topics at local, national, and international conferences and focuses on the impact of emerging technologies on culture, learning, and teaching. Her primary research interest is information policy and ethics.

You can catch Rachel on Saturday, January 26th at 12:15 at Cramer Hall, PSU, Room 158.

Part 1: Web 2.0 Tools/ Web 2.0 for Libraries and Librarians

This is the first part of a three-part series on Web 2.0 tools written by Michael Baird, (OR-7), Evening Reference Coordinator at the Oregon State University Valley Library. Michael is one of five librarians who post on Infododads, a blog which “reviews and discusses existing and new tools, services, and technology for finding information on the internet.” He will be the lead presenter discussing “Information Discovery for Librarians – Keeping Up with Web 2.0” at the Online Northwest 2008 Conference on February 22nd.

Two great introductions to Web 2.0 are a youtube entitled The Machine is Us/ing Us and this article by Tim O’Reilly entitled “What is Web 2.0: Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software”.

Subject Research Guides / Website Guides –

Use the del.icio.us linkroll feature for lists of links maintained in subject research guides or website guides. You don’t have to edit the webpage to change/edit/add links, just edit that group of links in your del.icio.us account. Look in the Other Suggested Resources section in the the Chelmsford Public Library for an example.

For a (relatively) small investment, Libguides is an amazing service that offers branded custom “widgets” that may be used as subject guides or portals for users. These widgets can pull in all sorts of information: RSS feeds, embedded video or podcasts, del.icio.us tag clouds and a lot more. Some even have live chat widgets (Meebo, Chatango, etc.) embedded. Here’s an example from Boston College University Library.

The Catalog –

What if you could rate items in the catalog? Comment on them? Leave recommendations for other users? Not possible? Sure it is. Check out this link for “A thread of grace” by Mary Doria Russell at Hennepin County Library. Note that the book has comments as well as tabs for summary, reviews, and excerpt.

Hennepin is also a great example of another web 2.0 technology in library catalogs. Is there a search you repeat on a regular basis? Do you have a favorite author? Add an RSS feed for your search and be notified when new items for that search are added to the catalog. Here is the RSS code for a keyword search on Miles Davis. Just copy and paste it into your feed aggregator (Google Reader, Bloglines, etc.).

Announcements –

Instead of updating text on your library homepage for each new event, service, or news update, use a blog. Again, this really opens the arena for any user to have the skills to create and publish the content. Aside from the initial setup, web skills are not necessary. Here is an example from Western Oregon University Library using a blog to feed news items to their home page. This library has two blogs feeding to their homepage: one for featured databases and one for announcements. The way these display is completely customizable so they “fit” the look and feel of the existing page and blend in.

Next week Michael writes about his favorite Web 2.0 tools.

EOU Volunteer Opportunity

Where: Could be done at a distance. (aka at home)

What: Help research for planning their new library by creating a report outlining

some of the main trends (in post-secondary education and librarianship)

that might affect how they design a library facility

and/or‚ a bibliography of articles, websites or pictures‚ illustrating particular trends or

cutting edge new libraries (academic, undergraduate libraries only).

When: The deadline is flexible. She would like to have a finished product

or the end of December, but can make the deadline end of January or end of February.

(if interest level is high and she will get a better project out of it.)

But must arrange deadline in advance, just so she knows when to expect something.

Who: Library Director at Eastern Oregon University

  1. primarily undergraduate liberal arts institution, so not interested in trends at the graduate research level.
  2. has a large distance education component here, so she is interested in how academic libraries are imagining they will be serving their populations at a distance.Details:You get to research the latest, cutting edge trends in new library facilities.

    What do the futurists think an academic library is going to look like in 5-10 years?

    What are the latest trends in teaching (at the post-secondary level) that the library needs to take into account and respond to? She is interested in articles talking about recent examples of innovations in these areas in small undergraduate liberal arts colleges in the US, and in their counterparts in Canada or overseas. This is a huge project that can be broken down into subtopics (so you can finish your school work too!) Possible subtopics to choose from: information commons (or integrating computers into the library in some other fashion); study areas, particularly group study (and integrating technology into these areas); cafeterias, coffee carts or cafes in the library; partnerships between the library and student services (for example copy services, bookstore services, tutoring services); eating inviting spaces for academic community interaction in the library; storage solutions such as compact shelving or off-site storage; -creating a completely or mostly digital library. increased need for group vs individual study areas (this would involve searching the literature of higher education to see if there are articles on the topic); merging reference and circulation desks, or doing away with reference desks in the library; use of electronic or high-tech equipment for group study (eg electronic whiteboards, teamspace)

    library needs to take into account and respond to?

    She is interested in articles talking about recent examples of

    innovations in these areas in small undergraduate liberal arts colleges in the US,

    and in their counterparts in Canada or overseas.

    This is a huge project that can be broken down into subtopics (so you can finish your school work too!)

    Possible subtopics to choose from:

    -information commons (or integrating computers into the library in some other fashion);

    -study areas, particularly group study (and integrating technology into these areas);

    -cafeterias, coffee carts or cafes in the library;

    -partnerships between the library and student services (for example copy services, bookstore

    services, tutoring services);

    -creating inviting spaces for academic community interaction in the library;

    -storage solutions such as compact shelving or off-site storage;

    -creating a completely or mostly digital library.

    – increased need for group vs individual study areas (this would involve searching the literature of higher education to see if there are articles on the topic)

    – merging reference and circulation desks, or doing away with reference desks in the library

    – use of electronic or high-tech equipment for group study (eg electronic whiteboards, teamspace)